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10. MVLL Organization

Posted by Eric Bickford at Jan 17, 2007 4:00PM PST ( 0 Comments )
Mountain View Little League offers a wide range of baseball opportunities for children 4-14 years old. The different divisions are designed to meet the needs of players as they grow and develop baseballs skills. The league consists of six divisions described below: Additional Notes T-Ball (Ages 4-5) At this most introductory level, children hit the ball off a hitting tee rather than face live pitching. All players play in the field at all times. In each inning, all players bat once. There are no balls, strikes, or outs, and no score is kept. Batters may take as many swings as needed to cleanly hit the ball off the tee. Regardless of the play in the field, all batters are awarded first base (at least). Runners are never out on the bases; therefore all players eventually score. Coaches can stand in the field during play to instruct the players. The game is called after one hour (typically two to three “innings”) Minors A (Ages 6-7) The team in the field typically plays 10 players (the usual positions plus an extra outfielder). At the start of the season, a pitching machine is used. Later in the season, the coaches pitch. The batting team uses a “continuous batting order” that includes all players, regardless of whether they have been in the field the previous inning. Batters are allowed 5 strikes. There are no umpires; base coaches make any necessary calls. The teams may keep score, but no standings are kept. Minors AA (Ages 8-9) The team in the field typically plays 10 players (the usual positions plus an extra outfielder). Pitchers are introduced to the game in this division. After 3 balls, coaches will finish pitching to a batter. The batting team uses a “continuous batting order” that includes all players, regardless of whether they have been in the field the previous inning. Batters are allowed 3 strikes. The batting team gets three outs; most normal baseball rules apply. There are no umpires; base coaches make any necessary calls. The teams may keep score, but no standings are kept. Minors AAA and Majors (Ages 10-12). All pitching is done by players. A league umpire is present to call balls and strikes as well as calling plays in the field. Almost all normal baseball rules apply. Players bat only if they are also in the field, but all players must get at least one at-bat and 2–3 innings in the field per game. In the Minors AAA, score is kept for each game, but there are no standings, and all teams advance to the playoffs. In the Majors, all scores are reported to the League, which maintains standings during the season. All Majors teams advance to the playoffs but are seeded according to regular-season standings. Junior League (Ages 13-14). This division plays on a full-sized baseball diamond and allows steals, pick-offs, etc. Games are played against Junior League teams from nearby cities, including Sunnyvale, Cupertino, Santa Clara, and Los Altos. No matter what division a child is in, every child is placed on a team and plays a minimum of 2–3 innings in each game. All teams are reselected each year.
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6. Player Discipline Policy

Posted by Eric Bickford at Jan 17, 2007 4:00PM PST ( 0 Comments )
MVLL hopes that disciplinary measures will not be necessary. Managers will however, establish a policy to follow, in case it does become necessary. The Manager’s disciplinary policy will, in general, meet the following guidelines:
  • The Manager will explain team objectives, rules and disciplinary policy to players and parents at the beginning of the season.li>
  • Discipline may not be applied arbitrarily or capriciously. It must be imposed evenly to all team members.li>
  • Discipline must be imposed progressively. Manager’s must first counsel the player, explaining what is expected and why. If a player continues to be a problem, the next step could mean less game time. Frequent and continuing problems can lead to suspension from a game or in extreme cases, suspension from the team. NOTE: Before a player can be suspended from a game, the Manager must notify the Player Agent. The Player Agent must concur before a player can be suspended from a team.
  • Pioneer and T-Ball Division Managers must inform parents that a player has violated team rules and explain what is expected and why. Major and Minor managers are required to notify parents only in case of major disciplinary problems that could result in suspension from a game or from the team.
  • Behavior that results in serious injury to another player or a serious infraction of the rules of safety is grounds for immediate suspension from a game or from the team.
  • Players and Parents have the right to appeal any decision on suspension or removal from the team. Submit such appeals in writing and addressed to the MVLL President and / or Player Agent.
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5. Player Commitment

Posted by Eric Bickford at Jan 17, 2007 4:00PM PST ( 0 Comments )
Team Managers may establish rules and policies consistent with MVLL’s goals. Players MUST pay attention to their Manager and / or Coaches, take an active part in games and practices, and follow the Manager’s and / or Coach’s instructions. Players MUST attend practices. Managers give most instruction at practices, and participation will determine the player’s position. MVLL requires personal commitment and team discipline appropriate to the ages of the players. By joining a team, a player makes a commitment to the team for the FULL season. As a player, you also make a commitment to do your best to work at being the best athlete you can be. To be a good sport, to play fairly and safely and to help others enjoy the game.
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Little League Pledge, Mission Statement

Posted by Eric Bickford at Jan 17, 2007 4:00PM PST ( 0 Comments )

I trust in God. I love my country And will respect its laws. I will play fair and strive to win. But win or lose, I will always Do my best


From the ranks of youngsters who stand now on the morning side of the hill,will come the leaders, the future strength and character of the nation.


MISSION STATEMENT

“Through proper guidance and exemplary leadership, the Little League program assists youths in developing the qualities of citizenship, discipline, teamwork and physical well-being. By exposing the virtues of character, courage and loyalty, the Little League Baseball program is designed to develop superior citizens rather than superior athletes.”
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9. Practices and Season Play

Posted by Eric Bickford at Jan 17, 2007 4:00PM PST ( 0 Comments )
Practice: The Manager of your youngster’s team will call practices during the days following final team assignments and prior to regular season play. Most managers will have a tentative practice schedule by the time players are notified. Every player should attend these practices, if school work permits. These practices are important. The Manager and Coaches need to begin working on fundamentals, help players with early conditioning and will explain the team rules and policies. It makes the Manager’s job much easier to go over the basics with the team as soon as possible. In addition, the players need to get to know each other to develop a sense of teamwork. After a few practices, the Manager will schedule practice games. Players should not wear their game uniforms for these practice games. Season Play: During the season, teams will usually play two games each week, including a Saturday game. In addition, managers will also schedule one or two weekly practices. Minimum Playing Time: Little League has a minimum playing time regulation that requires every player to play in each game. Exceptions to these regulations are allowed only when a player fails to appear for games, has unexcused missed practices or is being disciplined. For definitive rules at each Division, please contact your Team Manager. The minimum playing time rules do not imply equal game time for each player nor are they intended to remove the strategic choices of the manager. NOTE: Please be ON TIME when getting players to and from practices and games. Most managers and coaches also have their own families to attend to and do not have extra time to wait for parents to pick up their children.

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